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Tehran Article Sample (5)

Tehran: Navab High Way

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.

Tehran Article Sample (4)

The Golestan Palace is the former royal Qajar complex in Iran's capital city, Tehran. One of the oldest historic monuments in the city of Tehran

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.

Tehran Article Sample (3)

Darband:It is the beginning of a popular hiking trail into Mount Tochal, which towers over Tehran. A chairlift is also available for those not interested in hiking.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed sagittis massa eu nibh gravida ornare. Integer a pellentesque purus, vitae consectetur urna. Cras commodo suscipit magna in porttitor. Cras quis venenatis dolor. Nunc congue id libero ut feugiat.

SHIRAZ

SHIRAZ

Shiraz's Last Articles

Naqsh-e Rajab

Naqsh-e Rajab

Naqsh-e RajabNaqsh-e Rajab can be a convenient stop on the way to Persepolis and Naqsh-e Rostam. Although the site is very small, it contains four important Sassanid bas-reliefs, carved into...

Persepolis Fortifications

Persepolis Fortifications

Fortifications The platform of Persepolis was strongly fortified. On the south and west, it was protected by two stone ramparts, which rose several meters above the ground. On the north...

Persepolis Army Street

Persepolis Army Street

Army Street What is today known as the Army Street stretches from the east door of the Gate of All Lands to the north courtyard of the Hall of a...

Naqsh-e Rajab

Naqsh-e Rajab
Naqsh-e Rajab can be a convenient stop on the way to Persepolis and Naqsh-e Rostam. Although the site is very small, it contains four important Sassanid bas-reliefs, carved into three sides of a grotto-like bay at the foot of the Mountain of Mercy. The monumental character of Sasanid bas-reliefs is best exemplified in these early sculptures.

Persepolis Fortifications

Fortifications
The platform of Persepolis was strongly fortified. On the south and west, it was protected by two stone ramparts, which rose several meters above the ground. On the north and east, the fortifications were of mud-brick and included several defensive tiers. They included a very thick foundation wall, which at some points reached a width of 19 m and was composed of a number of parallel ramparts, space between which was filled with sand and rubble.

Persepolis Army Street

Army Street
What is today known as the Army Street stretches from the east door of the Gate of All Lands to the north courtyard of the Hall of a Hundred Columns? It is 92 m long and about 10 m wide. It was bordered by thick mud-brick walls, of which only low bases remain. At regular intervals of about 7 m, these walls were marked by stepped niches, where the guards might have stood on ceremonial occasions.

Persepolis Achaemenid tombs

Achaemenid tombs
To the northeast and southeast of the platform, at a height of about 40 m above its level, two tombs are cut out of the rock. They are considered to be those of Artaxerxes II and Artaxerxes III, although no one knows which tomb belongs to which king. The layout and artistic treatment of the mausoleums are almost identical to the royal graves in Naqsh-e Rostam.

Hall of a Hundred Columns

Hall of a Hundred Columns
The main part of the building - the second largest after the Apadana was occupied by a square central hall o with each side measuring 68.5 m. This hall was supported by one hundred columns about 14 m high-hence the appellation of the palace. The columns consisted of a | bell-shaped base; a discoid torus; a fluted, cylindrical shaft; and a double-bull capital.

Persepolis The Treasury

Treasury
Unquestionably the earliest structure in Persepolis, the Treasury was constructed in several stages. It was conceived by Darius, expanded later during his reign, and further enlarged under Xerxes. Originally, this huge building was enclosed by a high, mud-brick wall, and had an entrance on its west side. The entrance opened toward a line of small guardhouses, which were followed by three halls with four columns, and one room with two columns.

Persepolis The Museum

The Museum
The restored Museum building overlooks an open courtyard bordered by the Tripylon on the east, and the Treasury on the west. On the north, there were mud-brick barracks, possibly used as service areas. Built-in accordance with historical indications, the structure consists of a central hall supported by twelve columns, a north portico with eight columns, and several side vestibules and chambers. On both sides of the portico are what used to be small guardrooms, now occupied by the museum office and a souvenir shop.

Persepolis The Harem or Seraglio

The Harem or Seraglio
This palace is known today as the Harem ("the Inviolable Place”), but no structure in Persepolis has provoked more controversial opinions about its function. Scholars try to decide whether the building indeed housed the royal seraglio, or was an administrative structure, or even whether it provided additional storerooms for the Treasury. Some have suggested that the building accommodated the deputes of the subject-nations, claiming that the number of the rooms in the building coincided with the number of the nations represented by the gift-bearers on the Apadana stairs.

Hadish Palace

Hadish Palace
The construction of Hadish (perhaps a common name for 'residence”) was begun by Darius and completed by Xerxes. Its plan is essentially an expanded version of the Tachara. Its devastation has caused some scholars to deduce that Alexander's arson started at this point, perhaps in retaliation for Xerxes's burning of the Parthenon in Athens. Standing on a platform hewn from the natural bedrock, the Hadish was reached by four staircases: one from the Tachara courtyard, another from the court south of Tripylon, and the remaining two from the west wing of the Harem.

Persepolis Tachara Palace

Tachara Palace
One of the earliest structures on the platform, the Tachara (as the building is identified in one of its inscriptions), served as Darius I's private palace. The word means "winter house”, but there is no evidence showing whether the building was indeed occupied during the wintertime. However, its main facade, since it faces south, seems to lend credence to this idea. The building is also frequently called the Hall of Mirrors because its masonry was polished to a mirror-like, reflective finish.

Persepolis Apadana Palace

Apadana
The largest and most prominent of all Persepolis palaces, the Apadana was a place where the nobility, emissaries, and gift-bearers from all parts of the Achaemenid Empire were gathered in the presence of the mighty one who designated himself King of Kings. The structure was commenced at Darius's order in 515 B.C. and was brought to perfection during Xerxes's rule. Its construction probably took some thirty years, as evidenced by glazed bricks inscribed with the name of Xerxes, and found during the excavations. The palace remained in use for almost two centuries.

Persepolis Gate of All Lands (Nations)

Gate of All Lands (Nations)
The first palace of the complex is known as the Gate of All Lands. Built during Xerxes's reign, it served as a waiting room for the people expecting to be summoned before the king. The palace consisted of a square hall O and three massive portals, overlooking its east, south, and west sides. The hall measured 612.5 sq. m and was about 17 m high, with its ceiling supported by four stone columns.

Persepolis

Persepolis
Located in the Marvdasht Plain 50 km northeast of Shiraz, Persepolis presents what may be the most awesome ruins of the ancient world. The site is best visited on a day trip from Shiraz, or overnight if the sightseeing program also includes the neighboring Pasargadae, Naqsh-e Rostam, and Naqsh-e Rajab. Lying at an altitude of 1,770 m above sea level, Persepolis is located on a promontory projecting into the plain from a rocky hill at the foot of the northwest corner of the Mountain of Mercy, evidently, a sacred site, called during the pre-Islamic period the Mountain of Mehr, or Mithra.

Naqsh-e Rostam (Necropolis)

Naqsh-e Rostam (Necropolis)
Opposite the Mountain of Mercy and the turn-off onto the road leading to Persepolis, the living quarters of Achaemenid kings, stands the Necropolis, the magnificent place of their burial. The mountain of Hossein Kuh provides a remarkable natural screen, with the tomb-chambers of Achaemenid kings carved into the rock together with Elamite and Sasanid bas-reliefs.

Emir's Dam

Emir's Dam
Especially beautiful during the springtime, the Emir's Dam spans the Kor River at the southeastern extreme of the Marvdasht Plain. It was built around 970 at the order of Azod al-Dowleh, along with five other weirs between what is now the Khan Bridge and Lake Bakhtegan. A legend handed down from generation to generation in the family of the author's husband recalls their ancestor as the actual builder of this dam. This pious man, an architect by profession, is said to have had the ability to interpret dreams.