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The Eastern part of Fars province

The Eastern part of Fars province
 To travel east of Shiraz, the visitor should take the road that goes to Pol-e Fasa. At that point, the road forks. The left fork runs along the southern shore of Lake Maharlu and goes on to Sarvestan. Beyond Sarvestan, about the same distance as from Sarvestan to Lake Maharlu, the road branches again. The left branch goes to Fasa and Darab, while the right passes by Lake Parishan and continues to Neyriz. After Neyriz, there is a long stretch dividing settlements of Fars from the Kerman region; the road ends in Sirjan in the Kerman province.

Lar Water Storehouses

Lar Water Storehouses
Low level of precipitation, rapid evaporation, and long seasons of drought account for scant water resources in most regions of Iran, and have made people look for efficient ways of water collection and conservation. The construction of water storehouses, where water is accumulated during the rainy seasons and stored through the remaining year, has become one of the solutions to this problem. Though water storehouses are built in most parts of Iran, perhaps nowhere is their number as impressive as in Larestan.

Qeysariyeh Bazar of Lar

Qeysariyeh Bazar
The Qeysariyeh Bazaar is the most remarkable structure in Lar, and one of the most interesting historical monuments in the whole of Fars. The name Qeysarieh (“Royal") is usually attributed to those marketplaces that were constructed at the order of a king or a local ruler. These bazaars had elaborate architectural styles and housed shops trading, especially in luxury goods. The Lar Bazaar was in existence long before the Safavid period, but what we see today dates mainly from the 16th century.

The Maiden's Fortress

The Maiden's Fortress
Located at a distance of 3 km from Ardashir's Palace, Qal'e-ye Dokhtar housed the first residential and administrative quarters of the Sasanid kings. The palace was greatly fortified, in order to defend Ardashir's position from the Parthian survivors, who still threatened the newly founded Sasanid dynasty. Standing on a promontory of Mt. Firuzabad, Qal'e-ye Dokhtar was defended on three sides by precipices that fall nearly straight down from its outer walls and was thus almost invulnerable to enemy attacks.

Ardashir's Palace

Ardashir's Palace
The magnificent Palace of Ardashir stands outside the ruins of ancient Gur, at a distance of about 2 km to the north. It was built on a remarkably vast scale, sometime later than Qal'e ye Dokhtar. Generally, it repeats the design of Qal'e-ye Dokhtar, but greatly exceeds it in size and quality. Although closely adherent to Parthian building techniques, Ardashir's Palace is the earliest embodiment of all the basic elements of Sasanid architecture which were to persist until the downfall of the empire, and would survive long afterward in the Islamic architecture of Iran.